Why Playing Hard to Get is Harder Than Ever

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by Daniella Davidoff, Contributing Writer

 

It’s been 48 hours since the last text and just like that, I’ve decided that I can play hard to get too – or can I? At first, I am invigorated with anticipation of the chase; I will have to give in eventually, but not before the build up has reached such heights. However, this thoughtful strategy is only successful until twenty-first century technology manages to get creep its way into my operation. What was once a fun game soon becomes a challenge.

In a time long, long ago, or maybe just 10 years or so, carving time out to ring up a friend or loved one was a thing. Considered almost a pastime for today’s young couples, calls were something that could be a real inconvenience at times and assisted in actively ignoring that “special” someone. Fast forward to 2015, messages are irresistible and everywhere! Take a moment and think about any scenario in which you wouldn’t be able to read a text. Yeah, it’s a short list. So instead of being able to play hard to get with the help of inconvenient technology, there is now no choice but to see the message and be haunted by it.

Besides messaging, social media has made playing even more difficult. Now it’s not just direct contact parse, but a multitude of apps that assist in checking in with people or rather, checking on them. Between Instagram and Snapchat alone, keeping yourself from giving in to the temptation of sending a message to your partner in this fantastically ironic game can become extremely difficult, potentially pushing the concept of “playing hard to get” to the point of extinction. I mean, aren’t we more connected than ever?

After 48 hours of staring at the message icon on my phone, I came to a conclusion: technology has transformed the notion of  “playing hard to get” into a system of disappointment, not fun anticipation. Communication is faster and easier than ever before, so if you want to send that text, do it – I did. Because, at the end of the day, not taking that 1 of the 2,880 minutes in two days to reach out to someone doesn’t mean you’re hard to get, it means you’re probably not truly interested in being gotten.

 

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